Assignment In Brittany 1943 Film The Human

Helen Clark MacInnes, (born October 7, 1907, Glasgow, Scotland—died September 20, 1985, New York, New York, U.S.), Scottish-born American novelist, known for her taut, realistic espionage thrillers.

MacInnes received an M.A. from the University of Glasgow in 1928 and remained at the university for a year afterward as a special cataloger in the library. After a year of library work she entered the School of Librarianship of University College, London, in 1930, graduating the following year. In 1932 she married Gilbert Highet. Over the next several years they collaborated on a number of translations from German. In 1938, after Highet had taught for a year at Columbia University, he accepted a permanent post there, and the family settled in New York City. (They became naturalized U.S. citizens in 1951.)

A short time after moving to New York, MacInnes began her first book, Above Suspicion (1941), a tale of espionage in Nazi Europe. It was an immediate success, widely praised for its suspense and humour, and it was made into a motion picture in 1943. Assignment in Brittany followed in 1942 and was also made into a movie the following year. While Still We Live (1944) and Horizon (1945) were both suspenseful tales of World War II. Friends and Lovers (1947), a love story, was followed by a series of thrillers concerning international intrigue and Cold War tension, including Neither Five nor Three (1951), Pray for a Brave Heart (1955), Decision at Delphi (1960), The Venetian Affair (1963), Message from Málaga (1971), and Prelude to Terror (1978). Her final book, Ride a Pale Horse, appeared in 1984.

Almost all of MacInnes’s books were best-sellers, and they were frequently translated and reissued; several more were made into motion pictures. Critics and readers alike noted MacInnes’s skillful and credible portrayal of espionage and the characters involved in it. She credited her success to thorough research and her interest in international politics.

10 Best Adventures of 1945

By: Joshua Glenn
April 17, 2015

Seventy years ago, the following 10 adventures — plucked from my Best Forties Adventure list — were first serialized or published in book form. They’re my favorite adventures published that year.

A good year for talking-animal adventures…

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  1. E.B. White’s children’s fantasy adventure Stuart Little. A mouse born to a human family races a sailboat in Central Park, gets shipped out to sea in a garbage can, and sets out — several years before Kerouac’s On the Road — on a cross-country odyssey. The book was criticized, at the time, by the New York Public Library’s influential children’s lit expert for being nonaffirmative, inconclusive, and unfit for kids.
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  3. Murray Leinster’s science fiction adventure First Contact. A novella, published in Astounding Science Fiction, and retroactively awarded a Hugo Award (in 1996). When a scientific expedition sent to the Crab Nebula meets an alien crew of astronauts on a similar mission of exploration, neither team is sure how to react. While both crews are eager to acquire the others’ technology, and to establish a mutually beneificial relationship, they’re mutually suspicious, too. Fun fact: Leinster coined the phrase “first contact.”
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  5. Helen MacInnes’s prison-break adventure Horizon. Although not quite as exciting and satisfying as her best-known novels from the same era, Horizon is — like Above Suspicion, Assignment in Brittany, and While Still We Live — a suspenseful story about an Allied agent operating in Europe against the Nazis. Freed from an Italian prison camp, British soldier Peter Lennox joins a band of resistance fighters helping to pave the way for a crucial Allied push. After an action-packed first chapter or two, the book slows down… in an interesting way, one which demonstrates how much waiting is involved in espionage work, and how taxing it is.
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  7. C.S. Lewis’s dystopian science fiction adventure That Hideous Strength. Operating under the influence of Olaf Stapledon and David Lindsay, before he wrote The Chronicles of Narnia, Oxford don C.S. Lewis wrote a trilogy of theological science fiction yarns. That Hideous Strength, in which N.I.C.E., an ostensibly scientific institute, turns out to be a front for demonic entities plotting to ravage the Earth (if they can just locate and possess the body of Merlin, the Arthurian enchanter who lies in suspended animation), is the series’ final installment.
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  9. C.S. Forester’s historical sea-going adventure Commodore Hornblower. Published in the UK as The Commodore. In 1812, Horatio Hornblower — protagonist of a long-running series of novels and stories (1937–67) — is put in command of a squadron and sent to the Baltic; he is tasked with bringing Russia into the war against Napoleon. Using naval mortars, he destroys a French ship, then defends Riga against a besieging French force. Tsar Alexander I and Carl von Clausewitz make appearances. Fun fact: Hornblower’s implied sexual encounter with a Russian Countess caused controversy when the story first appeared in the Saturday Evening Post.
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  11. George Orwell’s dystopian talking-animal adventure Animal Farm. After the pigs Snowball and Napoleon lead a revolution against the drunken farmer Mr. Jones, they rename their home Animal Farm — a worker’s collective whose creed is “All animals are equal.” However, Napoleon and Snowball struggle for preeminence. Napoleon seizes power, then purges the farm of his rival’s supporters; he also begins to enrich himself and his cronies. Eventually, Napoleon decrees that “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.” The author was writing not an anti-utopian satire of the Stalin era, but rather an anti-anti-utopian lament for the missed opportunity offered by the Russian Revolution of 1917.
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  13. Dino Buzzati’s talking-animal adventure The Bears’ Famous Invasion of Sicily. One winter when their food supply runs out, the bears of Sicily descend from their mountain and enter into a pitched battle with the forces of the Grand Duke of Sicily. The bears capture the capital city… where their king, Leander, discovers his long-lost son, who was kidnapped and forced to perform for Sicilian audiences. All’s well that ends well… except that King Leander is sorry to see his bear subjects become ever more human-like. After a coup attempt by his corrupted chamberlain, Leander urges the bears to leave the city behind forever and return to their simple, bear-ish way of life.
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  15. Thomas B. Costain’s historical adventure The Black Rose. After participating in a raid on a castle, Walter — a 13th century young Englishman — flees Norman justice by striking out for the far-away semi-mythical land of Cathay (China). Along the way, he and his comrade join a gift-bearing caravan heading to the court of Kublai Khan; a beautiful captive, Maryam, asks the two to help her escape. This they attempt to do, even though the caravan has been joined by a fearsome escort: Bayan of the Hundred Eyes and his Mongol horde. Eventually, they return home bearing knowledge of amazing Chinese such as paper-manufacturing, gunpowder, the telescope, and the compass. Along the way, however, they lose Maryam. Forever? Loosely adapted in 1950 as an adventure movie starring Tyrone Power, Orson Welles, and Cécile Aubry.
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  17. Ngaio Marsh’s crime adventure Died in the Wool. In the 13th installment (of 32) in Marsh’s classic Roderick Alleyn series, we find the gentleman detective Alleyn doing counterespionage work in New Zealand. Fifteen months after Flossie Rubrick, MP, one of the most formidable women in New Zealand, turns up at an auction packed inside one of her own sheep farm’s bales of wool, Alleyn investigates. His detecting is founded upon stories told him by the chief witnesses in the case. Fun fact: Marsh is considered one of the five Golden Age “Queens of Crime” alongside Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers, Gladys Mitchell, and Margery Allingham.
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  19. Tove Jansson’s fantasy adventure The Moomins and the Great Flood. The first installment in the Finnish author’s beloved Moomintroll series! Moominmamma and Moomintroll search for Moominpappa; along the way, they adopt a little creature (later named Sniff), encounter a giant swamp serpent and an ant-lion, and join a group of Hattifatteners about to set sail. It’s all very Nordic: When Moominmamma falls into despair, at one point, everyone else gets gloomier and gloomier. With the help of a marabou stork, they also find Moominpappa’s house, which was carried away by a flood to a small valley — where they settle.

Also! I must mention the 1945 collection The Pocket Book of Adventure Stories, edited by Philip Van Doren Stern. I read it as an adolescent many times. Stories include: Hemingway’s “Fifty Grand,” Steinbeck’s “Flight,” Somerset Maugham’s “Red,” Richard Connell’s “The Most Dangerous Game,” and other classics.

Let me know if I’ve missed any 1945 adventures that you particularly admire. Also, please check out these additional lists. The 200 Greatest Adventure Novels of All Time. THE OUGHTS: 1904 | 1905 | 1906 | 1907 | 1908 | 1909 | 1910 | 1911 | 1912 | 1913.THE TEENS: 1914 | 1915 | 1916 | 1917 | 1918 | 1919 | 1920 | 1921 | 1922 | 1923. THE TWENTIES: 1924 | 1925 | 1926 | 1927 | 1928 | 1929 | 1930 | 1931 | 1932 | 1933. THE THIRTIES: 1934 | 1935 | 1936 | 1937 | 1938 | 1939 | 1940 | 1941 | 1942 | 1943. THE FORTIES: 1944 | 1945 | 1946 | 1947 | 1948 | 1949 | 1950 | 1951 | 1952 | 1953. THE FIFTIES: 1954 | 1955 | 1956 | 1957 | 1958 | 1959 | 1960 | 1961 | 1962 | 1963. THE SIXTIES:1964 | 1965 | 1966 | 1967 | 1968 | 1969 | 1970 | 1971 | 1972 | 1973. THE SEVENTIES: 1974 | 1975 | 1976 | 1977 | 1978 | 1979 | 1980 | 1981 | 1982 | 1983. I’ve only recently started making notes toward a list of Best Adventures of the EIGHTIES, NINETIES, and TWENTY-OUGHTS.

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MORE LIT LISTS FROM THIS AUTHOR:200 Greatest Adventure Novels of All Time | 100 Best Radium Age Sci-Fi Novels (1904–1933) | 75 Best Golden Age Sci-Fi Novels (1934–1963) | 75 Best New Wave Sci-Fi Novels (1964–1983) | 55 Best Scientific Romances (1864–1903) | Best 19th Century Adventure (1805–1903) | Best Nineteen-Oughts Adventure (1904–13) | Best Nineteen-Teens Adventure (1914–23) | Best Twenties Adventure (1924–33) | Best Thirties Adventure (1934–43) | Best Forties Adventure (1944–53) | Best Fifties Adventure (1954–63) | Best Sixties Adventure (1964–73) | Best Seventies Adventure (1974–83) | 101 Science Fiction Adventures | 70 Crime Adventures | 65 Fantasy Adventures | 61 Espionage Adventures | 40 Atavistic & Historical Adventures | 25 Frontier & Western Adventures | 20 Avenger & Artful Dodger Adventures | 20 Apophenic & Treasure Hunt Adventures | 20 War & Ruritanian Adventures | 18 Picaresque Adventures | 10 Robinsonade & Survival Adventures. ALSO:Best YYA Lit 1963 | Best YYA Lit 1964 | Best YYA Lit 1965 | Best YYA Lit 1966 | Best YYA Lit 1967 | THE OUGHTS: 1904 | 1905 | 1906 | 1907 | 1908 | 1909 | 1910 | 1911 | 1912 | 1913.THE TEENS: 1914 | 1915 | 1916 | 1917 | 1918 | 1919 | 1920 | 1921 | 1922 | 1923. THE TWENTIES: 1924 | 1925 | 1926 | 1927 | 1928 | 1929 | 1930 | 1931 | 1932 | 1933. THE THIRTIES: 1934 | 1935 | 1936 | 1937 | 1938 | 1939 | 1940 | 1941 | 1942 | 1943. THE FORTIES: 1944 | 1945 | 1946 | 1947 | 1948 | 1949 | 1950 | 1951 | 1952 | 1953. THE FIFTIES: 1954 | 1955 | 1956 | 1957 | 1958 | 1959 | 1960 | 1961 | 1962 | 1963. THE SIXTIES:1964 | 1965 | 1966 | 1967 | 1968 | 1969 | 1970 | 1971 | 1972 | 1973. THE SEVENTIES: 1974 | 1975 | 1976 | 1977 | 1978 | 1979 | 1980 | 1981 | 1982 | 1983. | I’ve only recently started taking notes towards a list of the Best Adventures of the EIGHTIES, NINETIES, and TWENTY-OUGHTS. | Best Scottish Fabulists | Radium-Age Telepath Lit | Radium Age Superman Lit | Radium Age Robot Lit | Radium Age Apocalypse Lit | Radium Age Eco-Catastrophe Lit | Radium Age Cover Art (1) | SF’s Best Year Ever: 1912 | Cold War “X” Fic | Best YA Sci-Fi | Hooker Lit | No-Fault Eco-Catastrophe Lit | Scrabble Lit |

Categories

Adventure, Lit Lists, Literature, Pulp, Read-outs

Tags

C. S. Lewis, Christianna Brand, Dino Buzzati, E.B. White, George Orwell, Helen MacInnes, Murray Leinster, Ngaio Marsh, Thomas B. Costain, Tove Jansson

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